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    Charlie

    Cabinet

    Cabinet magazine.

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    Cadovius, Poul

    The famous Danish interior architect, Poul Cadovius, was in the fifties looking for a furnishing system witch would give a maximum of comfort, underline the personal atmosphere of the interior, was easy to assembly, offer a lot of combination possibilities and made the living space larger. He invented the “Royal” shelving system which enabled flexible furnishing using endless combinations of a limited set of standard elements.

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    Caillebotte, Gustave

    Gustave Caillebotte. Crazy dope painter.

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    Canopic jar

    Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their owner for the afterlife. The jars were four in number, each charged with the safekeeping of particular human organs: the stomach, intestines, lungs, and liver.

    Canova, Antonio

    From the amazing FMR, available at Librissime. The cover features a marble bas-relief showing a detail from the work Le Grazie e Venere danzano davanti a Marte by Canova, created in statuary marble from the Fantiscritti quarry in Carrara, the same that supplied Antonio Canova. The bas-relief is set in velvet brocade with a gold thread weave. Inside, special velata pure cotton handmade paper, enhanced with an Antonio Canova watermark, carries press-printed texts by authors from the same period as Canova. The counterpoint to these texts are 26 plates showing tempere by Canova, all applied by hand and screen and litho printed, together with 5 etchings and 77 photographs of works by Canova, taken by Mimmo Jodice. Price: $226,000.00

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    Capela dos Ossos

    In Renaissance Europe, long before the concept of organ donation could have been envisioned, cadavers were given a new life as architectural ornaments, and skeletons were put to use as building materials. The monk who started this fad must have been the Martha Stewart of his day. Why continue piling up bones in an ossuary when you could put them to practical use-or better yet, turn them into a thing of beauty? Thus began the oddest interior-decorating style in history: rooms made entirely of human bones.

    Capela dos Ossos.

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    Capgras delusion

    The Capgras delusion (or Capgras syndrome) is a disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that a friend, spouse or other close family member, has been replaced by an identical-looking impostor.

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    Capuchin catacombs of Palermo

    Capuchins’ Catacombs located in Palermo, Italy, where there are thousands of corpses lined on the walls like paintings. The catacombs date back to the 1599 when the local priests mummified a holy monk for all to see. They wanted to pray to him after death.

    Carangi, Gia

    Gia Carangi was an American fashion model during the late 1970s and early 1980s. After she became addicted to heroin, Carangi’s modeling career rapidly declined. She later became infected with HIV and died at the age of 26. Her death was not widely publicized and few people in the fashion industry knew of it.

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    Caravaggio, Michelangelo

    Caravaggio. He had to be included.

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    Carax, Leos

    Interview about Tokyo.

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    Carrara

    Carrara is notable for the white or blue-grey marble quarried there. Many sculptures of the Renaissance, such as Michelangelo’s David, were carved from Carrara marble.

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    Carter, Shawn

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    Casa Malaparte

    Casa Malaparte is a house on Punta Massullo, on the eastern side of the Isle of Capri, Italy. The house was conceived around 1937 by Italian Rationalist architect Adalberto Libera for Curzio Malaparte. Malaparte actually rejected Libera’s design and built the home himself with the help of Adolfo Amitrano, a local stone mason.

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    Casa Mollino

    More images

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    Cassavetes, John

    I spent 2 weeks crying, with 1 hour intervals, and almost no sleep, after I had seen my first John Cassavetes film. This one is for him. The one and only artist, the only idol, the only man, that ever was. One love.

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    Cassinelli, Luigi

    Luigi Cassinelli.

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    Casta, Laetitia

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    Castiglioni, Achille

    Achille Castiglioni was a renowned Italian industrial designer. He was often inspired by everyday things and made use of ordinary materials.

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    Caswell-Massey

    Caswell Massey.

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    Catullus 16

    The poem, written in a hendecasyllabic (11-syllable) meter, was considered so explicit that a full English translation was not openly published until the late twentieth century.

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    Catwalk

    A camera follows model Christy Turlington through the spring fashion shows in Milan, Paris, and New York one year in the early 1990s.

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    Cavellini, Guglielmo Achille

     Guglielmo Achille Cavellini

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    Celmins, Vija

    Charlie Finch on her new show.

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    Cendrars, Blaise

    Blaise Candrars.

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    Centurion Card

    The Centurion Card, known informally as the black card, is a charge card issued by American Express. To become a Centurion cardholder, one must meet American Express’s strict eligibility criteria. American Express does not publicly disclose the requirements for getting a card.

    The Centurion Card, known informally as the black card, is a charge card issued by American Express.
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    Cercle de l’Union interalliée

    The cercle de l’Union interalliée, also known as the Cercle interallié is a social and dining club established in 1917 at No. 33 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris, France with Ferdinand Foch, Marshal of France, as its second president. It adjoins the embassies of Britain and Japan. The 3,100-member club has many international members and is frequently used for business conferences by organizations such as the WTO, Bank of England, Wharton Club of Paris, Forbes magazine and Radley College.

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    Chalayan, Hussein

    Hussein Chalayan’s 2009 spring/summer collection. Old, but classic nonetheless. Where J.G. Ballard’s Crash is cerebral and pop art and John Chamberlain’s automobile usage is corny, Hussein Chalayan manages to make something so sexy and graceful, as if burning hot metal was draped on the model’s body. SICK.

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    Chaplin, Geraldine

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    Chareau, Pierre

    Interior of Pierre Chareau’ Maison de Verre

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    Charles W. Cushman Photograph Archive

    Charles W. Cushman Photograph Archive

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    Château Lafite Rothschild

    Château Lafite Rothschild

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    Chatwin, Bruce

     

    Bruce Chatwin. Sublime travel writer.

    A quote from In Patagonia: He reached the Australian mainland at Cambridge Gulf, married a coal-black woman called Yamba, and lived thirty years among the Aboriginies, eating yams, snakes and witchety grubs (but never human flesh); sharing their treks, hunts battles and corroborees. His skill in wrestling made him a tribal hero and he rose to the rank of chief. Only when Yamba died did he strike out for White civilization.

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    Chefchaouen

    Chefchaouen is a Moroccan city noted for its buildings in shades of blue.

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    Cheyenne Mountain

    At the height of the Cold War in the late 1950s, the idea of a hardened command and control center was conceptualized as a defense against long-range Soviet bombers. The Army Corps of Engineers supervised the excavation of Cheyenne Mountain and the construction of an operational center within the granite mountain.

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    Citroën DS

    The Citroën DS is an executive car produced by the French manufacturer Citroën between 1955 and 1975. Styled by Italian sculptor and industrial designer Flaminio Bertoni.

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    Clark House

    The Clark House is an International-Modernist Style residence designed by Austrian-American Modernist architect Richard Neutra, and built in 1957 in Pasadena, California, United States.

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    Claude Glass

    A Claude glass is a small mirror, slightly convex in shape, with its surface tinted a dark colour. Bound up like a pocket-book or in a carrying case, black mirrors were used by artists, travellers and connoisseurs of landscape and landscape painting. Black Mirrors have the effect of abstracting the subject reflected in it from its surroundings, reducing and simplifying the colour and tonal range of scenes and scenery to give them a painterly quality.

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    Clementinum

    Clementinum is a great example of Baroque library for it hasn’t been changed since its foundation in 1722. It still shows the organization of the library in the times of the Jesuit college in Prague.

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    Clevin, Jørgen

    Jørgen Clevin. Danish all-around-man. An inspiration to everyone from my generation.

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    Cloer, Fidelis

    In a career spanning two decades, Fidelis Cloer has supplied presidents and dictators with the finest luxury armoured vehicles money can buy.

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    Cohiba

    Cohiba cigars.

    Colacello, Bob

    The former editor of Andy Warhol’s Interview, Colacello is an author, Vanity Fair contributor, and omnipresent figure on the New York social scene.

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    Collina, Pierluigi

    The one and only

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    Comme des Garcons

    Oh. Oh. Oh.

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    Common basilisk

    Common basilisk is a lizard found in Central and South American rainforests near rivers and streams. It is also known as the Jesus Lizard for its ability to run on the surface of water.

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    Company Flow

    Funcrusher Plus is the debut album by Brooklyn, New York hip-hop group Company Flow.

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    Cop, Blind

    Sacha van Loo, 36, is not your typical cop. He wields a white cane instead of a gun. And from the purr of an engine on a wiretap, he can discern whether a suspect is driving a Peugeot, a Honda or a Mercedes.

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    Coppi, Fausto

    The legendary Fausto Coppi.

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    Cordoba Fighting Dog

    The Cordoba Fighting Dog is an extinct breed of dog. The Cordoba was a crossbreed of Mastiff, Bull Terrier, Boxer, and Old English Bulldog. The Cordoba Fighting Dog originated in Córdoba, Argentina. The breed had such strong aggression toward other dogs that the males and females would rather fight than mate. In addition, many members of this breed died in the dog fighting pits, contributing to the breed’s extinction.

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    Corinth Canal

    The canal was mooted in classical times and an abortive effort was made to build it in the 1st century AD. Construction finally got underway in 1881 but was hampered by geological and financial problems that saw the original builders going bankrupt. It was completed in 1893, but due to the canal’s narrowness, navigational problems and periodic closures to repair landslips from its sheer walls, it failed to attract the level of traffic anticipated by its operators. It is now used mainly for tourist traffic.

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    Correspondencia

    New magazine from the guy who did Sede.

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    Corto Maltese

    Corto Maltese is a comics series featuring an eponymous character, a complex sailor-adventurer. It was created by Italian comic book creator Hugo Prattin 1967. The character embodies the author’s skepticism of national, ideological, and religious assertions. Corto befriends people from all walks of life, including the murderous Russian Rasputin (no relation with the historical figure, apart from physical resemblance and some character traits), British heir Tristan Bantam, Voodoo priestess Gold Mouth and Czech academic Jeremiah Steiner. He also knows and meets various real-life historical figures, including Jack London, Ernest Hemingway, Hermann Hesse, Butch Cassidy, James Joyce, Frederick Rolfe, Joseph Conrad, Sukhbaatar, John Reed, White Russian general Roman Ungern von Sternberg and Enver Pasha of Turkey. His acquaintances treat him with great respect, as when a telephone call to Joseph Stalin frees him from arrest when he is threatened with execution on the border of Turkey and Armenia.

    Cosmic Wonder

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8un30_cosmic-wonder-light-stream-centre-s_creation

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    Crane, Hart

    Hart Crane was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that is difficult, highly stylized, and very ambitious in its scope. In his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem in the vein of The Waste Land that expressed something more sincere and optimistic than the ironic despair that Crane found in Eliot’s poetry. In the years following his death at the age of 32, Crane has come to be seen as one of the most influential poets of his generation.

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    Crangi, Philip

    Good jewelery, good style.

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    Cravan, Arthur

    Arthur Cravan was known as a pugilist, a poet, a larger-than-life character, and an idol of the Dada and Surrealism movements. After his schooling, during World War I, he travelled throughout Europe and America using a variety of passports and documents, some of them forged. He declared no single nationality and claimed instead to be “a citizen of 20 countries”. Cravan set out to promote himself as an eccentric and an art critic, though his interest was showing off a powerful, striking personal style rather than discussing art. He staged public spectacles and stunts with himself at the centre, once acting on the front of a line of carts where he paraded his skills as a boxer and singer, although he never pursued either of these activities on stage with anyone else.

    Crème de Violette

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    Crosby, Harry

    Harry Crosby was the godson of J. P. Morgan and a friend of Ernest Hemingway. Living in Paris in the 1920s and directing the Black Sun Press, which published the works of James Joyce and others, Crosby was at the center of the wild life of the Lost Generation. Drugs, drink, sex, gambling, the deliberate derangement of the senses in the pursuit of transcendent revelation: these were Crosby’s pastimes until, in 1929, he shot his girlfriend, the recent bride of another man, and then himself.

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    Cruikshank, Sally

    CS Leigh

    He’s a master of the vanishing act and reinvention. First he dressed the stars at the Oscars, then he sold art to the rich, and now he’s a movie director. Every time he disappeared and changed his name, leaving behind a trail of suspicion. Read the story here.

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    Culatello

    Culatello di Zibello

    Culatello is a refined variety of prosciutto, made from heavier pigs, cut to a fraction of the normal prosciutto and aged, and may be cured with wine, with Culatello di Zibello having PDO status.

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    The Course of Empire

    The Course of Empire is a five-part series of paintings created by Thomas Cole in the years 1833-36.

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    Alpha

    Echo

    India

    Mike

    Quebec

    Uniform

    Yankee

    Bravo

    Foxtrot

    Juliet

    November

    Romeo

    Victor

    Zulu

    Charlie

    Golf

    Kilo

    Oscar

    Sierra

    Whiskey

    Delta

    Hotel

    Lima

    Papa

    Tango

    X-Ray